The secrets of high-performing security organizations

As the threat landscape becomes more sinister, the ability to close the IT security gap is more critical than ever.  Sponsored by HPE, this study has been tracking organizations’ efforts to close gaps in their IT security infrastructure that allow attackers to penetrate their defenses since 2018.

The IT security gap is defined as the inability of an organization’s people, processes and technologies to keep up with a constantly changing threat landscape. It diminishes the ability of organizations to identify, detect, contain and resolve data breaches and other security incidents. The consequences of the gap can include financial losses, diminishment in reputation and the inability to comply with privacy regulations such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA). Only 30 percent of respondents say their organizations are highly effective in keeping up with a constantly changing threat landscape and closing the IT security gap.

Ponemon Institute surveyed 1,848 IT and IT security practitioners in North America, the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia and Japan. This report presents the global findings and compares them to the 2020 global findings.  All respondents are knowledgeable about their organizations’ IT security and strategy and are involved in decisions related to the investment in technologies.

Few respondents are confident that their organizations can prevent a persistent threat below the platform that would result in data stolen, modified or viewed by unauthorized entities according to 35 percent of respondents. Similar to the last study, 48 percent of respondents believe attacks that have reached inside the network have the potential to do the greatest damage. Forty-two percent of respondents say that attacks inside the IT infrastructure can be detected quickly before they break out and cause a cybersecurity breach resulting in data stolen, modified, or viewed by unauthorized entities.

Best practices from organizations that are effective in closing the IT security gap

Thirty percent of respondents self-reported that their organizations are highly effective in keeping up with a constantly changing threat landscape. We refer to these organizations as “high performers” and compare their responses to the non-high performer. We refer to these organizations as “other” respondents.

Following are the nine best practices of high-performing organizations.

High performers are more likely to have visibility and control into users’ activities and devices. Only 33 percent of high performers believe their security teams lack visibility and control into all activity of every user and device. In contrast, 80 percent of those in the other category say their teams lack visibility and control. High performers are also more likely to get value from their security investments (59 percent vs. 42 percent of respondents). However, both groups agree that the IT infrastructure has gaps that allow attackers to penetrate its defenses (60 percent of high performers and 61 percent of respondents in the other category).

High performers are more likely to agree that attacks that have reached inside the network have the potential to do the greatest damage. Fifty-six percent of high performers recognize the potential damage from attacks that have reached inside the network vs. 45 percent of respondents in the other category. Forty-seven percent of high performers are confident that their organizations have not experienced a persistent threat below the platform software that has resulted in data stolen, modified or viewed by unauthorized entities vs. 30 percent in the other category.

High-performing organizations are more likely to implement a Zero Trust Model. Sixty-four percent of high-performing organizations have a Zero Trust Model because government policies required it (25 percent), have a Zero Trust Model for other reasons (24 percent of respondents) or selected elements from the Zero-Trust framework to improve security (15 percent). Thirty-six percent of organizations in the other category are not interested in a Zero Trust approach (25 percent of respondents) or have chosen not to implement (11 percent of respondents).

High performers say as compute and storage moves from the data center to the edge it requires a combination of traditional security solutions and secure infrastructure (61 percent). The other respondents are more likely to say a new type of security will be required (59 percent).

IoT security is more of a concern for high performers. Eighty-five percent of respondents say identifying and authenticating IoT devices accessing the network is critical to their organization’s security strategy. Only slightly more than half (55 percent) of other respondents agree with this. In addition, high performers are more likely to say legacy IoT technologies are difficult to secure (80 percent vs. 69 percent of respondents in the other category. Forty percent of high-performer respondents say their IoT devices are appropriately secured with a proper security strategy in place vs. 15 percent of respondents in the other sample.

High-performing organizations say security technologies are very important for their digital transformation strategy. Seventy-seven percent of high-performing organizations say it is important (35 percent of respondents) or highly important (42 percent of respondents) to have security technologies to support digital transformation. In contrast, 53 percent of the other respondents say it is important or highly important. 

High performers take a different approach to server security and backup and recovery. Eighty-eight percent of high performer respondents say backup and recovery is a key component of their security strategy and 68 percent of high performers say their organizations make server decisions based on the security inherent within the platform.

 High-performing organizations are more aware of the benefits of automation. The most important benefits are the ability to find attacks before they do damage or gain persistence (78 percent of high performers) and reduction in the number of false positives that analysts must investigate (74 percent of high performers). They also say automation is critical when implementing an effective Zero Trust Security Model (71 percent of respondents).

High-performing organizations are more likely to see the important connection between privacy and security. Ninety-four percent of respondents in high-performing organizations say it is not possible to have privacy without a strong security posture. Eighty-seven percent of high performers believe a strong cybersecurity posture reduces the privacy risk to employees, business partners and customers. High performers are less likely to believe human error is a risk to privacy.

To read the rest of this report, download it from HPE.com

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *