Two-thirds of security workers consider quitting because of burnout

Larry Ponemon

Security Operations Centers (SOC) are an increasingly important part of organizations’ efforts to keep ahead of the latest cybersecurity threats. However, for a variety of reasons revealed in this research, organizations are frustrated with their SOC’s lack of effectiveness in detecting attacks.

A SOC is defined as a team of expert individuals and the facility in which they work to prevent, detect, analyze and respond to cybersecurity incidents. Critical to the SOC’s success is support from the organization’s senior leaders, investment in technologies, and the ability to hire and retain a highly skilled and motivated team. The purpose of this research is to understand the barriers and challenges to having an effective SOC and what steps can be taken improve its performance.

Sponsored by Devo Technology, Ponemon Institute surveyed 554 IT and IT security practitioners in organizations that have a SOC and are knowledgeable about cybersecurity practices in their organizations. Their primary tasks are implementing technologies, patching vulnerabilities, investigating threats and assessing risks.

While respondents consider the SOC as essential or important, most respondents rate their SOC’s effectiveness as low and almost half say it is not fully aligned with business needs. Problems such as a lack of visibility into the network and IT infrastructure, a lack of confidence in the ability to find threats and workplace stress on the SOC team are diminishing its effectiveness.

“The survey findings clearly highlight that a lack of visibility and having to perform repetitive tasks are major contributors to analyst burnout and overall SOC ineffectiveness,” said Julian Waits, General Manager of Cyber, Devo. “It is critical that businesses make the SOC a priority and evolve its effectiveness by empowering analysts to focus on high-impact threats and improving the speed and accuracy of triage, investigation, and response.”

The following findings reveal why organizations have SOC frustration 

  • The visibility problem: The top barrier to SOC success, according to 65 percent of respondents, is the lack of visibility into the IT security infrastructure and the top reason for SOC ineffectiveness, according to 69 percent, is lack of visibility into network traffic.
  • The threat hunting problem: Threat hunting teams have a difficult time identifying threats because they have too many IOCs to track, too much internal traffic to compare against IOCs, lack of internal resources and expertise and too many false positives. More than half of respondents (53 percent) rate their SOC’s ability to gather evidence, investigate and find the source of threats as ineffective. The primary reasons are limited visibility into the network traffic, lack of timely remediation, complexity and too many false positives.
  • The interoperability problem: SOCs do not have high interoperability with the organization’s security intelligence tools. Other challenges are the inability to have incident response services that can be deployed quickly and include attack mitigation and forensic investigation services.
  • The alignment problem: SOCs are not aligned or only partially aligned with business needs, which makes it difficult to gain senior leadership’s support and commitment to providing adequate funding for investments in technologies and staffing. Further, the SOC budget is inadequate to support the necessary staffing, resources, and investment in technologies. On average, less than one-third of the IT security budget is used to fund the SOC and only four percent of respondents say more than 50 percent of the cybersecurity budget will be allocated to the SOC.
  • The problem of SOC analyst pain: IT security personnel say working in the SOC is painful because of an increasing workload and being on call 24/7/365. The lack of visibility in to the network and IT infrastructure and current threat hunting processes also contribute to the stress of working in the SOC. As a result, 65 percent say these pain factors would have caused them to consider changing careers or leave their job and many respondents say their organizations are losing experienced security analysts to other careers or companies.
  • As a result of these problems, the mean time to resolution (MTTR) can be months. Only 22 percent of respondents say resolution can occur within hours or days. Forty-two percent of respondents say the average time to resolve is months or years.

Read the rest of this report at Devo Technologies.

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