In which state are consumers most prepared for a cyber attack?

Larry Ponemon

Ponemon Institute is pleased to presents the results of a U.S.-based survey of consumers located in all 50 states and Washington D.C. Survey findings were used to create the Cyber Hygiene Index (CHI) that attempts to measure consumers’ ability to protect themselves from various criminal attacks, especially in the online environment.

The CHI consists of a series of positive and negative survey questions weighted by the relative importance of each question for achieving a high level of readiness.

In the context of this research we define cyber hygiene as an individual’s ability to maintain a high level of readiness in order to prevent, detect and respond to cyber-related attacks such as malware, phishing, ransomware and identity/credential theft. The index provides a score ranging from +37 points (highest possible CHI) to -39 points (lowest possible CHI).

A total of 4,290 respondents were surveyed, which represented a 3.2 percent response rate from a proprietary sampling frame of consumers located throughout the United States. A total of 553 surveys were removed from the final sample because of reliability failure. The state-by-state sample sizes varied from a low of 40 completed surveys in Wyoming to a high of 179 completed surveys in New York.

Figure 1 provides the CHI scores for the top 5 and bottom 5 U.S. states. The bracketed number next to each state is the relative ranking from the most positive score for New Hampshire (re: 4.29) to the most negative score for Florida (re: -6.29).

Figure 1

In this section, we provide an analysis of the CHI and survey findings. The figures summarize the results of our survey. Each chart provides the overall survey response compiled from our total sample of 4,290 U.S. consumers with comparison to the 100 individuals with the most risky responses. We call this group the Bottom 100.

The complete audited research results are presented in the Appendix of this report. We have organized the report according to the following topics:

  • The impact of identity theft on cyber hygiene
  • The impact of malware and phishing attacks on cyber hygiene
  • The impact of a lost device on cyber hygiene
  • The impact of password practices on cyber hygiene
  • The impact of online behavior on cyber hygiene
  • The impact of identity theft on cyber hygiene

Figure 2 shows the percentage of respondents who said they experienced an identity fraud or another identity theft crime over the past 12 months. Our hypothesis is that consumers who experience an identity related crime were less likely to have strong cyber hygiene at the time of the incident.

Figure 2

Figure 3 shows the immediate consequences of the identity theft. As can be seen, both the Overall and Bottom 100 show a similar pattern. The most significant consequence is the decline in credit because of a low FICO score, followed by the misuse or theft of the respondents’ credit or debit cards.

Figure 4 presents respondents’ level of cautiousness resulting from the identity theft incident. As shown, 42 percent of respondents said the incident had a significant impact on their level of caution when connected to the Internet or when sharing their personal information. In sharp contrast, 60 percent of the Bottom 100 said the incident had no impact on their online behaviors.

Figure 4

There are dozens more findings and charts in the report, which you can download for free at this link on Webroot.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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